Thursday, May 26, 2011

make books cool again

gods vagina

reinbeer and others



Ratko Mladic

inothernews:  Ratko Mladic, above, in 1993.  Via the New York Times:  Ratko Mladic,  the fugitive accused of masterminding the massacre at Srebrenica in  1995, had been captured but refused to give details.   Mr. Mladic, a former Bosnian Serb general, was one of the world’s most  wanted criminals, evading capture for more than 15 years despite an  increasing international effort to hunt him down. Serbian news reports  said that he was living under the name of Milorad Komadic and was  captured after a tip that he had identification documents for Mladic and  appeared physically similar.   Mr. Mladic was blamed for the worst ethnically motivated mass murder on  the Continent since World War II that resulted in the massacre of about  8,000 Muslim men and boys from the Bosnian town of Srebrenica.   Mr. Mladic had become the main obstacle to Serbia’s  candidacy to join the European Union. He had been in hiding since 1995,  widely believed to be protected by allies in the Serbian military and  intelligence.   (Photo: Petar Kujundzic / Reuters via the New York Times)

inothernews:

Ratko Mladic, above, in 1993. Via the New York Times:

Ratko Mladic, the fugitive accused of masterminding the massacre at Srebrenica in 1995, had been captured but refused to give details.

Mr. Mladic, a former Bosnian Serb general, was one of the world’s most wanted criminals, evading capture for more than 15 years despite an increasing international effort to hunt him down. Serbian news reports said that he was living under the name of Milorad Komadic and was captured after a tip that he had identification documents for Mladic and appeared physically similar.

Mr. Mladic was blamed for the worst ethnically motivated mass murder on the Continent since World War II that resulted in the massacre of about 8,000 Muslim men and boys from the Bosnian town of Srebrenica.

Mr. Mladic had become the main obstacle to Serbia’s candidacy to join the European Union. He had been in hiding since 1995, widely believed to be protected by allies in the Serbian military and intelligence.

(Photo: Petar Kujundzic / Reuters via the New York Times)

Saturday, May 21, 2011

lewis carol

A stick I found that weighed two pound: I sawed it up one day In 
pieces eight of equal weight! 
How much did each piece weigh? (Everybody says “a quarter of a 
pound”, which is wrong.) 

In Shylock’s bargain for the flesh was found No mention of the 
blood that flowed around: So when the stick was sawed in eight, 
The sawdust lost diminished from the weight.


http://www.pinkmonkey.com/dl/library1/carol52.pdf

road trip til the end

 From Jacksonville to Tampa, Florida (CNN) -- If you thought you had less than three perfectly healthy months to live, what would you do? Would you travel? Spend time with loved ones? Appreciate the joy life has given you?
Or would you ditch your kids and grandkids, join strangers in a caravan of RVs and travel the country warning people about the end of the world?
If you're Sheila Jonas, that's exactly what you'd do.
"This is so serious, I can't believe I'm here," says Jonas, who's been on the road since fall. Like her cohorts, she's "in it 'til the end," which she believes is coming in May.
She won't talk about her past because, "There is no other story. ... We are to warn the people. Nothing else matters."
Such faith and concern drove her and nine others, all loyal listeners of the Christian broadcasting ministry Family Radio, to join the radio station's first "Project Caravan" team.
They walked away from work, families and communities in places as far-flung as California, Kansas, Utah and New Jersey. Among them are an electrician, a TV satellite dish installer, a former chef, an international IT consultant and a man who had worked with the developmentally disabled.
They gave away cars, pets, music collections and more to relatives, friends and neighbors. Some items they kicked to the curb. In homes that weren't emptied, clothes are still hanging in closets, and dishes, books and furniture -- including one man's antique collection -- are gathering dust. Unless, of course, they've been claimed by others. If you believe it's all going to be over soon, why would it matter if you close the front door, much less lock it, when you walk away?
It's a mid-winter morning in Jacksonville, Florida, when CNN joins this faithful caravan. The "ambassadors," as they call themselves, are easy to spot. They are the 10 people milling about in an RV park drawing stares, eye rolls, under-the-breath mutters and, at times, words of support.
They're wearing sweatshirts and other clothing announcing the "Awesome News," that Judgment Day is coming on May 21. On that day, people who will be saved will be raptured up to heaven. The rest will endure exactly 153 days of death and horror before the world ends on October 21. That message is splashed across their five sleek, vinyl-wrapped RVs, bearing this promise: "The Bible guarantees it!"


http://www.cnn.com/2011/LIVING/03/06/judgment.day.caravan/index.html

want to see- the fall

zombie apolcolypse


CNN) -- The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a big, serious government agency with a big, serious job: protecting public health from threats ranging from hurricanes to bird flu.
So when the good doctors of Atlanta warned people this week about how to prepare for a zombie apocalypse, the world took notice.
"That's right, I said z-o-m-b-i-e a-p-o-c-a-l-y-p-s-e," Dr. Ali S. Khanwrote on the CDC website this week, adding casually that "Resident Evil" is his "personal favorite" zombie movie.
As it happens, Khan, one of the nation's top-ranking public health professionals (he's a rear admiral and an assistant surgeon general), doesn't actually believe the living dead are about to claw their way out of graves and start chewing on your brain.
But, he and his communications team recently noticed, what they'd want you to do if the world really did suddenly go "Night of the Living Dead" is pretty much the same thing they'd want you to do in case of a hurricane or a major pandemic.
From that realization to the decision actually to put up a blog post was a short step, Khan said Thursday.
Khan floated the idea of what to do in a meteor strike on earth not long after becoming director of CDC's Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response eight months ago, he said, so his staff knew he was open to "novel and creative ideas to engage the public."
Then the CDC got a question about zombies during an online chat about radiation leaks related to the meltdown at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in March, and they saw traffic spike.
Khan and his communications team knew they'd found a way to get the public interested in disaster preparedness, he said.
"You have a 'Resident Evil' movie coming out, 'Shaun of the Dead,' 'World War Z.' It's a good metaphor for where you have complete disruption," he said.
So they posted the advice on Monday. Their website crashed on Wednesday.
It's running sporadically as of this writing, so in case you can't get on, here's what CDC recommends:
Make an emergency plan. Stockpile food, water and medicine.
Have a utility knife, duct tape and battery-powered radio handy, along with some changes of clothes and bedding.
And keep some cleaning supplies handy, along with key personal documents like a driver's license and birth certificate.
The CDC also recommends having basic first aid supplies handy for a hurricane or a pandemic -- although, Khan admits on the CDC blog, "you're a goner if a zombie bites you."

the end of the world

http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2011/03/06/competition-for-when-the-world-will-end/

npr health blog- edit!

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

want want want

didn't love me back

mark ryden









http://www.markryden.com/index.html

how to train your octopus




http://www.petshopboxstudio.com/blog/2011/05/extraordinary-octopus-illustrations/

by: doug mackenzie

muslims

129

Friday, 16 June, 2000, 12:47 GMT 13:47 UK
Survivor of slavery dies in Brazil
Maria do Carmo Jeronimo, a former slave whose lack of a birth certificate prevented her recognition as the world's oldest woman, has died at the age of 129.

Jeronimo died of a stroke late on Wednesday at the University Hospital in Itajuba, 300 km (200 miles) north-west of Rio.

Maria do Carmo Jeronimo, former Brazilian slave
Maria do Carmo Jeronimo lived in three centuries

According to church records, Jeronimo was born on 5 March 1871 in the southeastern town of Carmo de Minas, in Minas Gerais state.

Brazil then was a monarchy under Emperor Pedro II, and Jeronimo, who was black, was born into slavery.

She was 17 when Brazil finally abolished slavery, but never left Minas Gerais.

For six decades she worked as a housemaid for the Guimaraes family, which in recent years tried unsuccessfully to have her recognized by the Guinness Book of Records as the world's oldest woman.

"They said the baptismal registry of the church in Carmo de Minas wasn't enough and demanded a birth certificate," said Agostinho Guimaraes in a recent interview.

"The problem is there were no certificates back then, especially for slaves."

Proof needed

The publication requires a birth certificate or other undisputed proof of age, because some past claims of longevity have turned out to be false.


The Guinness World Records book says the world's oldest person is Eva Morris, of Staffordshire in England, who is 114 years old.

It lists the oldest man as 110-year-old Benjamin Harrison Holcomb of the United States.

The oldest person ever with authenticated records was Jeanne Calment of France, who died on 4 August 1997 aged 122.

Still, local record books listed Jeronimo as the world's oldest woman, and she was honoured at a Carnival parade in Rio commemorating the abolition of slavery.

She also received a personal blessing from Pope John Paul II during a visit to Rio. At the age of 127, she finally saw the ocean.

Resistance

In her final years, Jeronimo had a series of strokes that effectively left her in a vegetative state.

But her resistance surprised Guimaraes family members, who took care of her when she no longer was able to work.

"We saw her go through many crises, many delicate situations and survive, " Thereza Guimaraes told the newspaper Hoje em Dia.

"We ended up thinking that it would go on forever."


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/793515.stm